Nico and Andy Warhol as Batman and Robin

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Batman Dracula is a 1964 American film that was produced and directed by Andy Warhol, without the permission of DC Comics. It was screened only at his art exhibits. A fan of the Batman serials, Warhol’s movie was a “homage” to the series, and is considered the first appearance of a blatantly campy Batman. The film was until recently thought to have been lost, until scenes from the picture were shown at some length in the 2006 documentary Jack Smith and the Destruction of Atlantis.

Andy Warhol’s Dracula

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Andy Warhol,Dracula, 1981, Polacolor 2 print. Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, Maine. Gift of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., The Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program

Fun fact: in 1974, Andy Warhol produced a film called Blood for Dracula. Art and film come together in an amazing way with this production.

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Screen Tests

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Lou Reed, Nico, Bob Dylan, and Edie Sedgwick in Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests (1966), which were originally conceived as “living portraits” (i.e. portraits done on film rather than on canvas) and featured silent, unbroken 3-4 minute shots of both famous & anonymous visitors to Warhol’s studio sitting in front of the camera.

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Screen test excerpts: Reed / Nico / Dylan / Sedgwick

Suicide (Fallen Body)

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On May Day, just after leaving her fiancé, 23-year-old Evelyn McHale wrote a note. “He is much better off without me… I wouldn’t make a good wife for anybody.” Then she crossed it out. She went to the observation platform of the Empire State Building. Through the mist she gazed at the street, 86 floors below. Then she jumped. In her desperate determination she leaped clear of the setbacks and hit a United Nations limousine parked at the curb. Across the street photography student Robert Wiles heard an explosive crash. Just four minutes after Evelyn McHale’s death, Wiles got this picture of death’s violence and its composure. The serenity of McHale’s body amidst the crumpled wreckage it caused is astounding. Years later, Andy Warhol appropriated Wiles’ photography for a print called Suicide (Fallen Body).